personal work

 

doghouses of guam, 2014 - 2015

Oil on mylar

During my visit to Guam in summer of 2013, I noticed that my grandparents’ dog was living in what used to be an air conditioning unit. I became deeply interested in the makeshift nature of Guam’s doghouses but was further impressed by the unshakeable love for humans that some of these backyard dogs displayed, despite their living conditions and lack of human affection. Yard dogs spend their lives tied to a chain in tropical heat, with limited space to roam, often covered with fleas and suffering from health problems, and receiving little to no human attention aside from being brought a dish of scraps. As a statesider who grew up thinking of the dog as a member of the family, the relationship to owners and their dogs on Guam became, for me, a symbol of cultural dissonance.

I drove around the southern part of the island taking snapshots of some of the different shelters created to shield the yard dogs from the sun, some of which are as spare as a piece of plastic leaned against a tree. The compositions include only the space that the dogs have access to; everything else is left empty and the pieces are left unframed to emphasize the sense of isolation and limitation within the vastness of space.  


marker drawings, 2014 - 2016

Copic marker on translucent vellum


deer, 2017 - 2018

charcoal


small metals, 2012 - present